2021 popular A Liberated Mind: lowest How to Pivot lowest Toward What Matters outlet sale

2021 popular A Liberated Mind: lowest How to Pivot lowest Toward What Matters outlet sale

2021 popular A Liberated Mind: lowest How to Pivot lowest Toward What Matters outlet sale

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"In all my years studying personal growth, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is one of the most useful tools I''ve ever come across, and in this book, Dr. Hayes describes it with more depth and clarity than ever before."-Mark Manson, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

Life is not a problem to be solved. ACT shows how we can live full and meaningful lives by embracing our vulnerability and turning toward what hurts.


In this landmark book, the originator and pioneering researcher into Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) lays out the psychological flexibility skills that make it one of the most powerful approaches research has yet to offer. These skills have been shown to help even where other approaches have failed. Science shows that they are useful in virtually every area--mental health (anxiety, depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, PTSD); physical health (chronic pain, dealing with diabetes, facing cancer); social processes (relationship issues, prejudice, stigma, domestic violence); and performance (sports, business, diet, exercise).

How does psychological flexibility help? We struggle because the problem-solving mind tells us to run from what causes us fear and hurt. But we hurt where we care. If we run from a sense of vulnerability, we must also run from what we care about. By learning how to liberate ourselves, we can live with meaning and purpose, along with our pain when there is pain.

Although that is a simple idea, it resists our instincts and programming. The flexibility skills counter those ingrained tendencies. They include noticing our thoughts with curiosity, opening to our emotions, attending to what is in the present, learning the art of perspective taking, discovering our deepest values, and building habits based around what we deeply want.

Beginning with the epiphany Steven Hayes had during a panic attack, this book is a powerful narrative of scientific discovery filled with moving stories as well as advice for how we can put flexibility skills to work immediately. Hayes shows how allowing ourselves to feel fully and think freely moves us toward commitment to what truly matters to us. Finally, we can live lives that reflect the qualities we choose.

Review

"In all my years studying personal growth, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is one of the most useful tools I''ve ever come across, and in this book, Dr. Hayes describes it with more depth and clarity than ever before." –Mark Manson, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

"Steven Hayes possesses an extraordinary trifecta of skills: A brilliant theoretical and research psychologist, he’s also a compassionate clinician and a wonderfully engaging writer. A Liberated Mind is packed with jewels of insight and information that could change the way we deal with suffering as individuals and as a society. A compelling, revelatory read." –Martha Beck Ph.D, author of Finding Your Own North Star

"Written for a very broad audience, Dr. Hayes is able to clearly translate the science and clinical complexity of this treatment into concrete guiding principles for people''s lives. These principles not only apply to psychological suffering, but also to physical illnesses, relationships, corporations, societies, and cultures. The book is honest, compassionate, and profoundly insightful. It will transform your life by liberating your mind." –Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology at Boston University

"The key to evolving consciousness is cultivating a flexible mind—open, present, empowered and aligned with deep values—and Steven Hayes does a brilliant job showing us how.   This book is organized around developing six psychological skills that clinical research shows, beyond all other factors, promote flexibility and translate into a happier and healthier life.  As you read this illuminating book, you’ll see how these skills are learnable, that you can start right now, and how when woven together, they offer a path to inner freedom." –Tara Brach, Ph.D, author of Radical Acceptance and True Refuge

"In our crisis-ridden society psychological flexibility is more needed than ever. Transcending shallow and ineffective behavioral approaches, Dr. Steven Hayes here presents a methodology, a skill-set, for emotional liberation that enables us to pivot from self-limitation to self-awareness and self-affirmative action." –Gabor Maté MD, author, When The Body Says No: Exploring The Stress-Disease Connection

"We can spend our lives avoiding the thoughts and feelings that cause us pain.  But Steve Hayes has become a leader in his field by understanding that things that cause us pain are things about which we care.  By learning to use psychological flexibility we can turn toward the difficult places to live with richness and meaning.  Compassionate, helpful, and authoritative, A Liberated Mind shows us a powerful way to a fulfilling life." –Susan David, PhD, author of Emotional Agility

"A Liberated Mind
provides an outstanding introduction to a psychological approach that has changed many lives by turning us toward focusing on our values.  The ideas and advice presented here help us truly understand what matters so that we can live with greater freedom, courage, and joy." –Kelly McGonigal, author of The Willpower Instinct and The Upside of Stress

"Having dealt with his own problems, such as panic attacks, Hayes deftly explains how to pivot by creating habits, accepting vulnerability and changing perspective." –Success Magazine

"His latest book functions as an ACT primer, from the therapy''s development (it sprouted from the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy tradition) to a variety of tools and practices that the reader can integrate immediately." –Spirituality & Health

About the Author

Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. The author of forty-three books and more than six hundred scientific articles, he has served as president of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy and the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and is one of the most cited psychologists in the world. Dr. Hayes initiated the development of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and of Relational Frame Theory (RFT), the approach to cognition on which ACT is based. His research has been cited widely by major media, including: Time magazine, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Men''s Health, Self, The Wall Street Journal, Psychology Today, O, The Oprah Magazine, and Salon.com.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Life should be getting easier, but it''s not. It''s a paradox of the modern world. At the very moment that science and technology are providing us previously unimagined longevity, health, and social interaction, too many of us struggle to live meaningful, peaceful lives full of love and contribution.

There is no question that we''ve made incredible progress over the last fifty years. That computer in your pocket called your phone is 120 million times more powerful than the guidance computer for Apollo 11-the first rocket to land people on the moon. Progress in health technology has been similar. Leukemia killed 86 percent of the children who contracted it fifty years ago-now it kills less than half that. In the last twenty-five years, child mortality, maternal mortality, and deaths from malaria all declined 40 to 50 percent. If physical health and safety were the issue and you could pick only the moment to be born in the world but not to whom, you could not do better than to choose today.

Behavioral science is another matter. Yes, we are living longer. But it is hard to make the case that we are living happier, more successful lives.

We have more accurate information than ever about illnesses that are largely due to lifestyle. Yet despite billions of dollars spent on research, our healthcare systems are staggering under the dramatically rising rates of obesity, diabetes, and chronic pain. Mental illness is rapidly becoming much more of a problem, not less. In 1990, depression was the fourth leading cause of disability and disease worldwide after respiratory infections, diarrheal illnesses, and prenatal conditions. In 2000, it was the third leading cause. By 2010, it ranked second. In 2017 the World Health Organization (WHO) rated it number one. Approximately forty million Americans over age eighteen have been diagnosed as having an anxiety disorder, and almost 10 percent of Americans report "frequent mental distress." We don''t feel as though we have adequate time. We don''t take care of ourselves the way we''d like. Our health suffers. Many of us are putting one foot in front of the other while lacking a real sense of purpose and vitality. Every day, someone who seems to have a good life decides to eat a bottle of pills rather than continue one more day.

How can this be?

I believe it is because we have not risen to the challenges of being human in the modern world. Some of the very things we have been doing over the last hundred years to foster human prosperity have created our conundrum. Take the case of innovations in technology. Each step forward-radio to TV to the Internet to the smartphone-has created greater mental and social challenges, and our culture and minds haven''t adjusted rapidly enough in effective and empowering ways.

As a result of our technology, we are all exposed to a constant diet of horror, drama, and judgment. In addition, many of us are left feeling overwhelmed and threatened by the rapid pace of change. A concrete example: only a few decades ago children ran and played freely in ways that could bring child endangerment complaints today. This increased protectiveness is not due to the world actually becoming more dangerous; research suggests it has not. Our impression that the world is less safe results more from exposure to uncommon events through the media. No matter how calm we feel, we can turn on our computers and see a tragedy unfold, complete with images of those who died just minutes ago. The twenty-four-hour news cycle shreds our veil of safety with constant videos of capricious violence.

When the external world changes at this speed, our internal world needs to change too. That sounds logical, but it is hard to know what steps to take.

The good news is that behavioral science has developed a plausible answer to how we can do better. Over the last thirty-five years, my colleagues and I have studied a small set of skills that say more about how human lives will unfold than any other single set of mental and behavioral processes previously known to science. That is not an exaggeration. In over one thousand studies, we''ve found that these skills help determine why some people thrive after life challenges and some don''t, or why some people experience many positive emotions (joy, gratitude, compassion, curiosity) and others very few. They predict who is going to develop a mental health problem such as anxiety, depression, trauma, or substance abuse, and how severe or long-lasting the problem will be. These skills predict who will be effective at work, who will have healthy relationships, who will succeed in dieting or exercise, who will rise to the challenges of physical disease, how people will do in athletic competition, and how they will perform in many other areas of human endeavor.

This set of skills combines to give us psychological flexibility. Psychological flexibility is the ability to feel and think with openness, to attend voluntarily to your experience of the present moment, and to move your life in directions that are important to you, building habits that allow you to live life in accordance with your values and aspirations. It''s about learning not to turn away from what is painful, instead turning toward your suffering in order to live a life full of meaning and purpose.

Wait, turning toward your suffering?

That''s right. Psychological flexibility allows us to turn toward our discomfort and disquiet in a way that is open, curious, and kind. It''s about looking in a nonjudgmental and compassionate way at the places in ourselves and in our lives where we hurt, because the things that have the power to cause us the most pain are often the things we care about most deeply. Our deepest yearnings and most powerful motivations lie hidden inside our most unhealthy defense systems. Our impulse is usually either to try to deny our pain, by suppression or self-medication, or to get caught up in dwelling on it through rumination and worry, allowing it to take charge of our lives. Psychological flexibility empowers us to accept our pain and live life as we desire, with our pain when there is pain.

I believe psychological flexibility is a means of achieving human liberation; it is the counterweight that people need to rise to the increasing challenges of the modern world. And hundreds of studies show that the skills that allow us to develop psychological flexibility can be learned, to a degree even through books such as this one. I know these are big claims, but if I do my job, by the end of this book you will understand why the skills that build flexibility are so powerful and how you can begin developing them in yourself.

It''s perhaps not surprising that the core message of turning toward our pain echoes other approaches, such as the mindfulness literature developed out of spiritual traditions, or the emphasis on exposure in cognitive behavioral therapy. But the new science of psychological flexibility is not aping old themes-by repeatedly asking why these methods work, it has arrived at a deeper understanding of the importance of flexibility skills and how to establish them. This understanding was produced by a scientific community that followed a new path of research, resulting in a new and more integrated set of methods for living happier and healthier lives.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Randy Burgess
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
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Reviewed in the United States on September 7, 2019
I''m a fan of this new book & can recommend it highly to anyone looking for techniques for moving toward a life of meaning rather than a life of feeling pushed around. However, I have the advantage of already being familiar with the approach that underlies the... See more
I''m a fan of this new book & can recommend it highly to anyone looking for techniques for moving toward a life of meaning rather than a life of feeling pushed around.

However, I have the advantage of already being familiar with the approach that underlies the book - a type of self-help and talk therapy I''ve practiced for many years.

If you are NOT familiar with this approach, but would like to learn a little more before committing your time and $$, this review is for you! It''s long, but that way you''ll get the full picture.

The author, Steven Hayes, is a talk therapist & academic psychologist. He''s best known as the founder of a talk therapy called Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, or ACT. He and a small band of researchers began developing ACT decades ago. Early on it was little-known, but that changed in 2006, when TIME magazine ran an article on Hayes & ACT with the title of "Happiness Isn''t Normal". That title wasn''t strictly accurate - but it did capture a crucial quality of ACT that makes it unique.

Up until quite recently, nearly all modern talk therapies were built around an assumption borrowed from medicine: Namely, that illness of any sort represents a breakdown of our default state of perfect health. Another way to say this is that talk therapies such as CBT traditionally treated anxiety, depression, marital problems, substance abuse, etc., as if they were the psychological equivalents of a broken leg.

All well & good - except that CBT researchers began to discover that some methods that relied on the model didn''t work very well - e.g. the idea that clients should dispute "irrational thoughts" and replace them with "rational thoughts," the way a mechanic might switch out a bad fuel injector in your car. Doubts crept in about the "mental health is normal, mental illness is abnormal" method. One response was the "positive psychology" movement - and another response was ACT.

ACT flipped the old assumptions. Similar to Buddhism (but based on science, not religion) the ACT model contended that the typical "normal" for the human mind isn''t health, but suffering. What causes the suffering? Where Buddhism talks vaguely of "conditioning", ACT offers a precise model of how our powerful ability to use abstract thought to change the outer world can get us in trouble when it comes to our inner world - the world of our thoughts & emotions. The model further explained why CBT ideas such as "thought fixing" were failing, & what might work better instead.

Suffice to say that where in 2006, many in the field were skeptical of ACT, today psychology has swung around to the extent that many ACT concepts have been widely adopted by those doing new research within CBT. Terms include "acceptance", "self-compassion", "values", "mindfulness", "psychological flexibility", etc. It''s a different ballgame thanks to ACT & other "third-wave" therapies, e.g. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy.

Back to this book. Put simply, "A Liberated Mind" is Hayes''s attempt to take ACT techniques and popularize them for everyone - whether or not you have a diagnosed mental illness. You might be a parent juggling kids & work; or someone stressed by social media & doomful headlines; or struggling to cope with an illness; or wanting to make a move or change in your life but scared about how to start. This book is for all of that, and more.

That 2006 TIME article I mentioned? One direct effect of the article was to boost sales for Hayes''s then brand-new self-help book, "Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life." The book became a best-seller and remains so even today. You can think of "A Liberated Mind" as being like "Get Out of Your Mind" - only for ALL readers.

Two other neat things about this book:

- Hayes walks us through both his professional and personal lives. The professional tour helps us understand how psychology evolved as a field and how it has intersected with the popular culture that surrounds us. And the personal tour gives us an inspiring inside look at how Hayes first hit upon the core moves of ACT in his struggle to cope with panic attacks as a young man. The author''s willingness to share is what gives much of this book its power.

- The bulk of the book is a manual of how to learn the core skills taught by ACT. The tips in these chapters are clearer than anything I''ve seen in an ACT self-help book. Plus there are plenty of anecdotes showing how real-life people have used the skills to move forward in their life.

That''s what ACT hopes to give to us. The model speaks compassionately of pain as inherent to the human experience - yet at the same time speaks to the potential we have for lives of purpose, meaning, joy, connection. In a word, liberation.
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S. Reiff
5.0 out of 5 stars
A life-enhancing book by one of the great Psychologist''s of the 21st century
Reviewed in the United States on August 27, 2019
My wife and I ordered "A Liberated Mind" (ALM) after I shared with her my experience of being in an Acceptance and Commitment (ACT) Immersion online course with Dr. Hayes. In ALM, Dr. Hayes provides access and tools towards creating a life that has meaning, values, and... See more
My wife and I ordered "A Liberated Mind" (ALM) after I shared with her my experience of being in an Acceptance and Commitment (ACT) Immersion online course with Dr. Hayes. In ALM, Dr. Hayes provides access and tools towards creating a life that has meaning, values, and that one wishes to live. He does not pathologize living, nor does he try to sell a "new and improved" school of thought complete with coaching, journals, and a shopping cart to market himself. A deep thinker, Dr. Hayes discusses issues that are of particular relevance in the fractured society that we are living in - such as spirituality, loneliness, yearning, and belonging to name a few. In ALM, you have the opportunity to learn how to listen to both your own and other people''s hearts and to experience other people with acceptance as a practice rather than as a concept. Learning ACT does not necessarily replace previously learned theories and spiritual beliefs, rather it is a tool that can be used in isolation as well as to amplify other meaningful work that can be done with clients and oneself. Spirituality is presented as another avenue that a person has to have a life with meaning and purpose.

Dr. Hayes discusses just how hard it is for a person to live with a never ending stream of thoughts - many of which are unkind, dishonest, and destructive. Dr. Hayes also presents strong evidence for why what people try to do to rid oneself of thoughts, feelings, sensations, and beliefs ultimately does not work and often creates new problems (addictions, disconnection, and falling into potentially harmful patterns of behavior). The concepts of pivoting towards what matters is explained and the reader is given a map and exercises to gain experiences for how to have a more meaningful and a flexible life. I work with children and teenagers and my colleagues and I have found Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) a very useful tool in assisting children with a wide range of challenges. Many children, such as those with Autism, struggle with having flexible thinking. This book provides strategies, exercises, and examples of how to become less rigid and how to help children and teenagers become less rigid in their thinking.

Steve Hayes guides without cajoling, teaches without lecturing, and leads without bullying. Dr. Steven Hayes has written and co-authored several other books with ALM being his most accessible title for both therapists and non-therapists. This book will appeal to many people who enjoyed the topics in Dr. Jordan Peterson''s book, but without the politics and controversy. This book will also be of use for therapist who wish for their client''s to have a resource between, after, and perhaps even before therapy. Dr. Hayes has combined mindfulness, habit formation, and cognitive therapy in a beautiful book. Highly Recommended.
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Colorado Reader
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Masterpiece work from a great mind in psychology
Reviewed in the United States on August 28, 2019
I am blown away by this book. Dr. Steven Hayes is well-known in psychology for being the founder of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. In this book, he weaves together a tale of psychological science with his personal story, along with exercises and important ideas to use... See more
I am blown away by this book. Dr. Steven Hayes is well-known in psychology for being the founder of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. In this book, he weaves together a tale of psychological science with his personal story, along with exercises and important ideas to use in your everyday life to make it better and more meaningful.

Hayes applies his approach to everything from depression and anxiety, to healthy behaviors, improving work and sports performance, and making positive changes in the world. It''s written in an accessible way, and I think everyone who reads it (including mental health professionals, people wanting some self-help from a true expert, and people who are just interested in psychology) will find something useful in this book. I highly recommend it!
41 people found this helpful
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BRK
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Crossing the River of Suffering in the Boat of Love
Reviewed in the United States on September 18, 2019
I am a psychotherapist and a pastor. I spent 2018 deep-diving into Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). This was not only a pivotal professional decision, but a personal one as well. I learned how to make space for thoughts and feelings that I''d become fairly... See more
I am a psychotherapist and a pastor. I spent 2018 deep-diving into Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). This was not only a pivotal professional decision, but a personal one as well. I learned how to make space for thoughts and feelings that I''d become fairly inhospitable towards. I learned to map out a clear vision for my destination and allow my values to guide me as a compass along the way. I learned to notice, name, and neutralize the effects of recurring patterns of debilitating thinking (e.g. anxiety-fueled procrastination loops) to finish graduate studies in the beautifully difficult language of Ancient Hebrew. I learned to not numb the painful emotions stirred up by two years of infertility despite deep longings to start a family with my wife. This is not to mention the countless innocuous applications of ACT for everyday life: facing difficult conversations head on, not flipping to Facebook whenever I got bored of slow, plodding work, acknowledging the role Netflix-binging played in pulling me away from living with vitality.

A Liberated Mind is the latest in Dr. Steven C. Hayes work on ACT. I preordered it months in advance because I knew it would be rich and in-spiring (in the old sense of breathing life within). I knew I would recommend its message to many others, but not before recommending it to myself first. I knew it would be replete with rigorous research, insightful illustrations, and accessible applications because that is the kind of art and science work I''ve come to expect from Dr. Hayes. It has not disappointed.

I am grateful personally and professionally for the brilliant and humane work of Dr. Hayes and his colleagues in developing ACT in my own life and vocation of forming lovers. People who live to love and love to live. The great Spanish poet, John of the Cross, summarizes much of ACT in a way only a poet can do: “I saw the river over which every soul must pass to reach the kingdom of heaven and the name of that river was suffering: and I saw a boat which carries souls across the river and the name of that boat was love.”

I write this review with heart-full gratitude.
37 people found this helpful
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EL
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Author just simply talks too much
Reviewed in the United States on May 17, 2020
there Is much to admire in this book....the author has done his work and has therefore got much to offer, as well as being exceptionally revealing of his own personal struggles. I appreciated this greatly as I launched into the book. Hayes give a good review of... See more
there Is much to admire in this book....the author has done his work and has therefore got much to offer, as well as being exceptionally revealing of his own personal struggles. I appreciated this greatly as I launched into the book.

Hayes give a good review of the psychological therapy history, and the respective shortcomings of each phase. He also does a very intriguing job of connecting mindfulness (derived from Vedic and Buddhist tradition) with deep dive cognitive science, so again there, really had me going. And then...somewhere around page 200, he starts to ramble and pontificate and blabber and meander so much I started turning pages to get through. Not sure I can bear it.

Oh why must every expert in a field fall in love with their own text. Do these people not realize how many words they are writing? There is paragraph after paragraph noting supporting research, and then backtracking, and then more theoretical justification, and then more hand-holding, and then, and then......zzzzzzzz.

Is it a directive from the publisher that writer must crank out a minimum number of pages to satisfy a volume requirement? Reading through this book entirely I felt as though I was trying to finish a child’s birthday cake, getting nauseous with sweet sugary food.

The problem, for me at least, is that structure of the therapeutic steps, Pivots, as he calls them, are very abstract and not well delineated. I felt each task and “step” bleeding into the next, thus a faux-process. (I’m sure for many others it will not seem this way....)

I can see that this writer has something important to offer but he’s just completely swamped me in verbiage and quaint elaborations. I believe good science writing need be efficient and salient. This book becomes a polemic for ACT Therapy and all its merits. It didn’t work for me.

If you’ve much time to tiptoe through the tulips with Mr. Hayes, you may find a life changing value here, I guess it will work brilliantly for some and not for others. So, I selected 3-stars....a good book, overwrought, somewhat self promoting, could have been edited down into an excellent book by limiting it to 200 or so pages.
25 people found this helpful
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Clinton F.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Instant Classic
Reviewed in the United States on August 28, 2019
This book is at once accessible and profound. I personally enjoy that everything in the book is based on decades of careful research, but that the ideas and techniques discussed are communicated in an understandable way. I will add more once I’ve had time to... See more
This book is at once accessible and profound. I personally enjoy that everything in the book is based on decades of careful research, but that the ideas and techniques discussed are communicated in an understandable way.

I will add more once I’ve had time to reflect on the book as a whole.
19 people found this helpful
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Progressive
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
In the spirit of William James
Reviewed in the United States on September 16, 2019
Spoiler alert: I an a clinical psychologist, and I have learned ACT from Steve Hayes for the past 20 years. His work has changed my life for the better. Nowhere in psychology will you find someone who covers the breadth and depth of Hayes. One of America''s most widely... See more
Spoiler alert: I an a clinical psychologist, and I have learned ACT from Steve Hayes for the past 20 years. His work has changed my life for the better. Nowhere in psychology will you find someone who covers the breadth and depth of Hayes. One of America''s most widely cited psychologists, he combines heart and science in this volume. He gives it his all, and this book serves as a kind of summary statement, intended as part legacy and part wake up call to a slumbering culture.

Steve Hayes has been relentlessly focused for forty years on understanding the origins of human suffering. He has been equally focused on finding ways to alleviate that suffering. He succeeded. And it''s all in this book. Read it. Give it to others. Learn from it.
18 people found this helpful
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Ashley Greenwell, PhD
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is the real deal. It delivers science, compassion, and wisdom at a time we need it most.
Reviewed in the United States on September 8, 2019
The world is awash with self-help books that are sometimes funny, entertaining, and temporarily inspiring...until we find ourselves right back where we started and perhaps even more frustrated. A Liberated Mind is an artful balance of solid research and very practical... See more
The world is awash with self-help books that are sometimes funny, entertaining, and temporarily inspiring...until we find ourselves right back where we started and perhaps even more frustrated. A Liberated Mind is an artful balance of solid research and very practical guidance that can be applied to all types of human suffering. As clinical psychologist in the field, this book is now my go-to for my clients, family, and, of course, myself.
10 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

AP
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A beautifully written & powerful book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 15, 2019
I’ve just finished A Liberated Mind by Steven Hayes. I couldn’t put it down, well ok I did a number of times, including to pause as a memory popped up which I observed and noticed some dots joined together, and to do some of the exercises. It is a powerful and beautifully...See more
I’ve just finished A Liberated Mind by Steven Hayes. I couldn’t put it down, well ok I did a number of times, including to pause as a memory popped up which I observed and noticed some dots joined together, and to do some of the exercises. It is a powerful and beautifully written book. I say I’ve finished it yet I haven’t really, what I have done is read it cover to cover and done some of the exercises along the way. I’m going to be doing the exercises I haven’t yet done and creating myself a plan of exercises to incorporate into life as I keep exploring & learning more about acceptance & commitment therapy (ACT). ACT has been part of my life a little while and I’ve used aspects in clinic with compassion focused therapy, though I’ve not used ACT daily myself. It’s companion for me is Compassionate Mind Training (CMT) (Compassion Focused Therapy in the therapy setting) which I have woven into daily life over the last few years and into clinic. Having immersed myself into the book the last three days and done some of the exercises I can see it would be helpful for me to weave ACT into my daily life too. I am a Physiotherapist & Coach who helps people with neurological conditions and those struggling with persistent pain (chronic pain) and know that what I’ve learned, and am learning, will have many benefits in clinic as well as for me personally. I live with persistent pain and usually live well despite pain, however this year I was struggling with some changes, many things in this book have helped and I’ve dropped the rope (for now!). This book has given me clarity, information and tools to use for myself and the people I work with. I know what I have learnt, and will continue to learn, will help me, my family, friends and those I work with in clinic every day. I will be sharing learning in little ways as best I can. If you like me value living the best you can, following a life aligned with your values, understanding what it is to be human, and learning to dance through life with flexibility then you will love this book. This book is packed full of wisdom, it’s beautifully written, it creates a sense of wonder and curiosity and it connects deeply. I am grateful for reading this book for many reasons. I am finding words are escaping me to sum it up effectively so here’s my main summary...WOW!
3 people found this helpful
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Miss S Bent
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Want to change how you think about your thoughts
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 15, 2019
I love this book! Having read some of the authors previous books and struggled to really grasp the intricacies of ACT, I am delighted that Steve Hayes has written this book. He makes understanding complex ideas accessible to the general reader. I know I can now revisit his...See more
I love this book! Having read some of the authors previous books and struggled to really grasp the intricacies of ACT, I am delighted that Steve Hayes has written this book. He makes understanding complex ideas accessible to the general reader. I know I can now revisit his previous books and with the information and insights gleaned from “The Liberated Mind”, understand more fully my own thought processes and the psychological theory behind Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. If you have struggled with negative thoughts, with uncomfortable feelings and with living the kind of life you truly want to be living. Then this is a worthwhile investment. I haven’t finished this book yet but I am enjoying every page.
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Dov Benyaacov Kurtzman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Becoming A Better Human
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 9, 2019
A Liberated Mind by Steven Hayes is not just a book about a psychotherapy its a book about how to increase the quality of your life and the life of others whether they are you clients, family, friends neighbors, colleagues or community - this book is relevant to better your...See more
A Liberated Mind by Steven Hayes is not just a book about a psychotherapy its a book about how to increase the quality of your life and the life of others whether they are you clients, family, friends neighbors, colleagues or community - this book is relevant to better your relationships and communication in all situations. "Becoming a Better Human" would have been my choice for subtitle for this book. I thoroughly recommend it to all that are interested in themselves becoming better humans or helping others to do so. Best regards Dov Benyaacov- Kurtzman
One person found this helpful
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Cosmin Radulescu
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Inspiring and informative
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 10, 2019
Being in anxiety recovery since childhoold i’m very happy to have found ACT and Steven Hayes’ work. Many of it’s tools can be found in other old therapies and traditions but ACT delivers them in a simple, down-to-earth and working framework, probably the best for anxiety...See more
Being in anxiety recovery since childhoold i’m very happy to have found ACT and Steven Hayes’ work. Many of it’s tools can be found in other old therapies and traditions but ACT delivers them in a simple, down-to-earth and working framework, probably the best for anxiety and depression. The book also tells the story of Dr. Hayes’ own recovery from anxiety, which is trully inspiring. A very good read.
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Daniel
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book will help you with life''s challenges. Especially reading this one.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 6, 2021
There are some great exercises in this book that will really benefit you if you suffer with anxiety etc. But this book is way too long. Too much focus on statistics and the history of ACT. It felt like the book was constantly trying to prove itself to the reader. Would I...See more
There are some great exercises in this book that will really benefit you if you suffer with anxiety etc. But this book is way too long. Too much focus on statistics and the history of ACT. It felt like the book was constantly trying to prove itself to the reader. Would I recommend it? Yes but prepare yourself for the information overload.
One person found this helpful
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