new arrival The sale Speed of Dark (Ballantine outlet online sale Reader's Circle) outlet online sale

new arrival The sale Speed of Dark (Ballantine outlet online sale Reader's Circle) outlet online sale

new arrival The sale Speed of Dark (Ballantine outlet online sale Reader's Circle) outlet online sale

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Product Description

Thoughtful, provocative, poignant, unforgettable, The Speed of Dark is a gripping journey into the mind of an autistic person as he struggles with profound questions of humanity and matters of the heart.

In the near future, disease will be a condition of the past. Most genetic defects will be removed at birth; the remaining during infancy. Lou Arrendale, a high-functioning autistic adult, is a member of the lost generation, born at the wrong time to reap the rewards of medical science. He lives a low-key, independent life. But then he is offered a chance to try a brand-new experimental “cure” for his condition. With this treatment Lou would think and act and be just like everyone else. But if he was suddenly free of autism, would he still be himself? Would he still love the same classical music—with its complications and resolutions? Would he still see the same colors and patterns in the world—shades and hues that others cannot see? Most important, would he still love Marjory, a woman who may never be able to reciprocate his feelings? Now Lou must decide if he should submit to a surgery that might completely change the way he views the world . . . and the very essence of who he is.
 
Tenth anniversary edition • With a new Introduction by the author

Praise for The Speed of Dark
 
“Splendid and graceful . . . A lot of novels promise to change the way a reader sees the world; The Speed of Dark actually does.”— The Washington Post Book World
 
“[A] beautiful and moving story . . . [Elizabeth] Moon is the mother of an autistic teenager and her love is apparent in the story of Lou. He makes a deep and lasting impact on the reader while showing a different way of looking at the world.”— The Denver Post
 
“Every once in a while, you come across a book that is both an important literary achievement and a completely and utterly absorbing reading experience—a book with provocative ideas and an equally compelling story. Such a book is The Speed of Dark.”—Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel
 
“A remarkable journey [that] takes us into the mind of an autistic with a terrible choice: become normal or remain an alien on his own planet.”—Mary Doria Russell, author of The Sparrow
 
“A powerful portrait . . . an engaging journey into the dark edges that define the self.”— The Seattle Times

Review

“Splendid and graceful . . . A lot of novels promise to change the way a reader sees the world; The Speed of Dark actually does.”— The Washington Post Book World
 
“[A] beautiful and moving story . . . [Elizabeth] Moon is the mother of an autistic teenager and her love is apparent in the story of Lou. He makes a deep and lasting impact on the reader while showing a different way of looking at the world.”— The Denver Post
 
“Every once in a while, you come across a book that is both an important literary achievement and a completely and utterly absorbing reading experience—a book with provocative ideas and an equally compelling story. Such a book is The Speed of Dark.”—Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel
 
“A remarkable journey [that] takes us into the mind of an autistic with a terrible choice: become normal or remain an alien on his own planet.”—Mary Doria Russell, author of The Sparrow
 
“A powerful portrait . . . an engaging journey into the dark edges that define the self.”— The Seattle Times

From the Inside Flap

Thoughtful, poignant, and unforgettable, The Speed of Dark is a gripping exploration into the world of Lou Arrendale, an autistic man who is offered a chance to try a brand-new experimental “cure” for his condition. Now Lou must decide if he should submit to a surgery that might completely change the way he views the world . . . and the very essence of who he is.

From the Back Cover

Thoughtful, poignant, and unforgettable, "The Speed of Dark is a gripping exploration into the world of Lou Arrendale, an autistic man who is offered a chance to try a brand-new experimental "cure" for his condition. Now Lou must decide if he should submit to a surgery that might completely change the way he views the world . . . and the very essence of who he is.

About the Author

Elizabeth Moon grew up on the Texas border, served three years of active duty in the USMC (1968–71), and now lives with her husband, also a veteran, near Austin, Texas. She has published more than twenty-five novels, including Nebula Award winner The Speed of Dark, Hugo finalist Remnant Population, and the enduring epic fantasy series The Chronicles of Paksenarrion. She has published more than fifty short-fiction pieces in anthologies and magazines and in four of her own short-fiction collections, most recently Moon Flights and Deeds of Honor. When not writing, Moon enjoys photographing native plants and wildlife, knitting socks, and cooking.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CHAPTER ONE
 
Questions, always questions. They didn’t wait for the answers, either. They rushed on, piling questions on questions, covering every moment with questions, blocking off every sensation but the thorn stab of questions.
 
And orders. If it wasn’t, “Lou, what is this?” it was, “Tell me what this is.” A bowl. The same bowl, time after time. It is a bowl and it is an ugly bowl, a boring bowl, a bowl of total and complete boring blandness, uninteresting. I am uninterested in that uninteresting bowl.
 
If they aren’t going to listen, why should I talk?
 
I know better than to say that out loud. Everything in my life that I value has been gained at the cost of not saying what I really think and saying what they want me to say.
 
In this office, where I am evaluated and advised four times a year, the psychiatrist is no less certain of the line between us than all the others have been. Her certainty is painful to see, so I try not to look at her more than I have to. That has its own dangers; like the others, she thinks I should make more eye contact than I do. I glance at her now.
 
Dr. Fornum, crisp and professional, raises an eyebrow and shakes her head not quite imperceptibly. Autistic persons do not understand these signals; the book says so. I have read the book, so I know what it is I do not understand.
 
What I haven’t figured out yet is the range of things they don’t understand. The normals. The reals. The ones who have the degrees and sit behind the desks in comfortable chairs.
 
I know some of what she doesn’t know. She doesn’t know that I can read. She thinks I’m hyperlexic, just parroting the words. The difference between what she calls parroting and what she does when she reads is imperceptible to me. She doesn’t know that I have a large vocabulary. Every time she asks what my job is and I say I am still working for the pharmaceutical company, she asks if I know what pharmaceutical means. She thinks I’m parroting. The difference between what she calls parroting and my use of a large number of words is imperceptible to me. She uses large words when talking to the other doctors and nurses and technicians, babbling on and on and saying things that could be said more simply. She knows I work on a computer, she knows I went to school, but she has not caught on that this is incompatible with her belief that I am actually nearly illiterate and barely verbal.
 
She talks to me as if I were a rather stupid child. She does not like it when I use big words (as she calls them) and she tells me to just say what I mean.
 
What I mean is the speed of dark is as interesting as the speed of light, and maybe it is faster and who will find out?
 
What I mean is about gravity, if there were a world where it is twice as strong, then on that world would the wind from a fan be stronger because the air is thicker and blow my glass off the table, not just my napkin? Or would the greater gravity hold the glass more firmly to the table, so the stronger wind couldn’t move it?
 
What I mean is the world is big and scary and noisy and crazy but also beautiful and still in the middle of the windstorm.
 
What I mean is what difference does it make if I think of colors as people or people as sticks of chalk, all stiff and white unless they are brown chalk or black?
 
What I mean is I know what I like and want, and she does not, and I do not want to like or want what she wants me to like or want.
 
She doesn’t want to know what I mean. She wants me to say what other people say. “Good morning, Dr. Fornum.” “Yes, I’m fine, thank you.” “Yes, I can wait. I don’t mind.”
 
I don’t mind. When she answers the phone I can look around her office and find the twinkly things she doesn’t know she has. I can move my head back and forth so the light in the corner glints off and on over there, on the shiny cover of a book in the bookcase. If she notices that I’m moving my head back and forth she makes a note in my record. She may even interrupt her phone call to tell me to stop. It is called stereotypy when I do it and relaxing her neck when she does it. I call it fun, watching the reflected light blink off and on.
 
Dr. Fornum’s office has a strange blend of smells, not just the paper and ink and book smell and the carpet glue and the plastic smell of the chair frames, but something else that I keep thinking must be chocolate. Does she keep a box of candy in her desk drawer? I would like to find out. I know if I asked her she would make a note in my record. Noticing smells is not appropriate. Notes about noticing are bad notes, but not like bad notes in music, which are wrong.
 
I do not think everyone else is alike in every way. She has told me that Everyone knows this and Everyone does that, but I am not blind, just autistic, and I know that they know and do different things. The cars in the parking lot are different colors and sizes. Thirty-seven percent of them, this morning, are blue. Nine percent are oversize: trucks or vans. There are eighteen motorcycles in three racks, which would be six apiece, except that ten of them are in the back rack, near Maintenance. Different channels carry different programs; that would not happen if everyone were alike.
 
When she puts down the phone and looks at me, her face has that look. I don’t know what most people would call it, but I call it the I AM REAL look. It means she is real and she has answers and I am someone less, not completely real, even though I can feel the nubbly texture of the office chair right through my slacks. I used to put a magazine under me, but she says I don’t need to do that. She is real, she thinks, so she knows what I need and don’t need.
 
“Yes, Dr. Fornum, I am listening.” Her words pour over me, slightly irritating, like a vat of vinegar. “Listen for conversational cues,” she tells me, and waits. “Yes,” I say. She nods, marks on the record, and says, “Very good,” without looking at me. Down the hall somewhere, someone starts walking this way. Two someones, talking. Soon their talk tangles with hers. I am hearing about Debby on Friday . . . next time . . . going to the Did they? And I told her. But never bird on a stool . . . can’t be, and Dr. Fornum is waiting for me to answer something. She would not talk to me about a bird on a stool. “I’m sorry,” I say. She tells me to pay better attention and makes another mark on my record and asks about my social life.
 
She does not like what I tell her, which is that I play games on the Internet with my friend Alex in Germany and my friend Ky in Indonesia. “In real life,” she says firmly. “People at work,” I say, and she nods again and then asks about bowling and miniature golf and movies and the local branch of the Autism Society.
 
Bowling hurts my back and the noise is ugly in my head. Miniature golf is for kids, not grownups, but I didn’t like it even when I was a kid. I liked laser tag, but when I told her that in the first session she put down “violent tendencies.” It took a long time to get that set of questions about violence off my regular agenda, and I’m sure she has never removed the notation. I remind her that I don’t like bowling or miniature golf, and she tells me I should make an effort. I tell her I’ve been to three movies, and she asks about them. I read the reviews, so I can tell her the plots. I don’t like movies much, either, especially in movie theaters, but I have to have something to tell her . . . and so far she hasn’t figured out that my bald recitation of the plot is straight from a review.
 
I brace myself for the next question, which always makes me angry. My sex life is none of her business. She is the last person I would tell about a girlfriend or boyfriend. But she doesn’t expect me to have one; she just wants to document that I do not, and that is worse.
 
Finally it is over. She will see me next time, she says, and I say, “Thank you, Dr. Fornum,” and she says, “Very good,” as if I were a trained dog.
 
Outside, it is hot and dry, and I must squint against the glitter of all the parked cars. The people walking on the sidewalk are dark blots in the sunlight, hard to see against the shimmer of the light until my eyes adjust.
 
I am walking too fast. I know that not just from the firm smack of my shoes on the pavement, but because the people walking toward me have their faces bunched up in the way that I think means they’re worried. Why? I am not trying to hit them. So I will slow down and think music.
 
Dr. Fornum says I should learn to enjoy music other people enjoy. I do. I know other people like Bach and Schubert and not all of them are autistic. There are not enough autistic people to support all those orchestras and operas. But to her other people means “the most people.” I think of the Trout Quintet, and as the music flows through my mind I can feel my breathing steady and my steps slow to match its tempo.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
426 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

dtamayob
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Eloquent, heart-filled and ambitious
Reviewed in the United States on February 28, 2019
My son has Asperger Syndrome and while this book was enlightening and incredibly insightful, it was also painful to read, which is why it sat in my "Currently Reading" list for so long. I had to pace myself, taking in a little at a time, so I did not get overwhelmed by how... See more
My son has Asperger Syndrome and while this book was enlightening and incredibly insightful, it was also painful to read, which is why it sat in my "Currently Reading" list for so long. I had to pace myself, taking in a little at a time, so I did not get overwhelmed by how close to home Lou''s struggle with daily life hits.

In addition to the "learnings" I encountered on every page, I did love the story and the characters, and enthusiastically give this book five stars for its eloquence, heart, and ambition. The description sounds an awful lot like Flowers for Algernon, but don''t let the possibility of it being a bit derivative stop you from picking this up.

Just like [book:Wonder|11387515], [book:The Speed of Dark|96063] definitely one of those "oh, I''m so glad I read this" kinds of novels. Its warmth and inspiration will stay with you long after you''ve finished.
5 people found this helpful
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audrey frances
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
an autistic narrator deals with the vicissitudes of life
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2017
This novel is set in a near-future where genetic defects are cured early in life, or even in utero. Only a few autistic individuals remain, and our narrator, Lou Arrendale is one. He works with a small group of autists for a corporation. Their pattern solving skills have... See more
This novel is set in a near-future where genetic defects are cured early in life, or even in utero. Only a few autistic individuals remain, and our narrator, Lou Arrendale is one. He works with a small group of autists for a corporation. Their pattern solving skills have helped the company but now they have a hostile supervisor who''s trying to force them to undergo an experimental ''corrective'' procedure. Trouble is, Lou and the others aren''t sure they want, or need, to be ''fixed''.

Told in the first person, the reader is immediately immersed in Lou''s world as he navigates the tricky, nuanced world of ''normals''. We are privy to Lou''s observations and reasoning, and he''s an interesting, good person who is trying to deal with work, hobbies .. and possibly love.

This is a great read, an intriguing story with a fascinating protagonist, believable secondary characters and a satisfying end.

Another good book with an autistic narrator is The Rosie Effect.
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Eric Ribbens
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A profound book
Reviewed in the United States on February 18, 2016
Wow. What a profound book. Very occasionally you will read a book that sticks with you, that you think about again and again, that changes your perceptions of the world. This is one of those books. It is slightly science-fictiony; for example, there is now a treatment for... See more
Wow. What a profound book. Very occasionally you will read a book that sticks with you, that you think about again and again, that changes your perceptions of the world. This is one of those books. It is slightly science-fictiony; for example, there is now a treatment for autism if it is given to fetuses or newborns. And there is an experimental new treatment for adult autistics. But the plot weaves so well within this world that I completely forgot it wasn''t quite real.

The central character is an adult man with autism. I don''t have autism myself, but I am somewhat obsessive-compulsive, and certainly wierd by most people''s standarrds, although I don''t usually think about it. By the time I was halfway through this book I was seeing the world differently, thinking in shorter declarative sentences, looking for patterns, and acutely aware of my difference. It wasn''t a very comfortable feeling, but I couldn''t wait to get back to the book.

I''m not going to tell you how the book plays out, except to say that this is an imaginative and wonderful piece of excellent writing, that will affect you forever. I can''t recommend it too much. Well done, Elizabeth, well done.
11 people found this helpful
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Warren Anderson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poignant, insightful, relevant
Reviewed in the United States on August 27, 2018
What does it mean to be differently abled? When is it a problem, and why? When is it a gift? And who has the right to answer these questions? As we head toward a future with the ability to edit our genetic codes, to modify how our brains work, and where computers will... See more
What does it mean to be differently abled? When is it a problem, and why? When is it a gift? And who has the right to answer these questions? As we head toward a future with the ability to edit our genetic codes, to modify how our brains work, and where computers will continue to take over many of the tasks we do for work and recreation, these questions will require careful thought. This book asks them, and goes some distance toward answering them, but without finally leading the reader to any particular conclusion. The protagonist is one of the best developed and compelling fictional characters I have ever had the privilege to know, both starkly alien and yet undeniably human. The story is engaging, and the writing is persuasive and elegant in its simplicity. You don''t need to be a science fiction fan to enjoy this book. You just need to be human.
4 people found this helpful
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BookWoman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Autism and Character
Reviewed in the United States on July 25, 2016
Elizabeth Moon gives a compellingly deep look into the world as seen through the eyes of a young man living with autism. Written in the first person, we "see" from his perspective and begin to acquire a new vocabulary of being. if you''ve never known an autistic... See more
Elizabeth Moon gives a compellingly deep look into the world as seen through the eyes of a young man living with autism. Written in the first person, we "see" from his perspective and begin to acquire a new vocabulary of being. if you''ve never known an autistic person, the initial immersion into that world may feel jarring. But within the unfamiliar voice you will find will empathy for those who are "other". As the protagonist, Lou, becomes known to the reader, the "otherness" fades. And a fully human man emerges, a character that displays every nuance of personality. Although a work of fiction, the book is an excellent primer on the beauty and value of embracing difference, through the vehicle of an autistic individual''s humanity. As the author is also a mother of an autistic young man, she gives a true sense of what that world may be like from the inside, as well as a story that shines with love and hope.
8 people found this helpful
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Kathy Jordan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Speed of Dark is an excellent novel for people to learn a little more about how our autistic citizens cope with the world.
Reviewed in the United States on February 28, 2016
In a future world it is good to think that autistic people will be honored for the gifts they have. Lou is an amazing person. Definitely autistic, but also perhaps super human in his ability to see other''s behaviors for what they really are, and to cope with a world that is... See more
In a future world it is good to think that autistic people will be honored for the gifts they have. Lou is an amazing person. Definitely autistic, but also perhaps super human in his ability to see other''s behaviors for what they really are, and to cope with a world that is still somewhat confusing and dysfunctional to him. His inner conversations about his experiences help him to really understand and cope with the ever changing personalities of "normal". The sad disconnect between his friends that are autistic and his "normal" friends becomes less of a burden. As the parent of an autistic adult I dream about the world that will accept our children for the gifts that they bring. Don''t be misled however, Lou''s choices are difficult and ultimately made me sad.
6 people found this helpful
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Piaw Na
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An excellent novel about autism
Reviewed in the United States on October 6, 2014
The Speed of the Dark is Elizabeth Moon''s science fiction book about autism. The science fiction parts of the book aren''t very apparent. It''s set in the future where autism can be cured in the womb, and follows Lou Arrendale, one of the last autistic people left. He''s a... See more
The Speed of the Dark is Elizabeth Moon''s science fiction book about autism. The science fiction parts of the book aren''t very apparent. It''s set in the future where autism can be cured in the womb, and follows Lou Arrendale, one of the last autistic people left. He''s a high functioning autistic, and can live on his own, hold down a job doing pattern matching, and goes fencing. The novel is told mostly from his point of view.

The central conflict in the novel describes a new director for Lou''s job, Crenshaw, who decides that all the extra amenities and facilities that Lou and his colleagues need to be able to work are perks that should be cut. To that end, he "encourages" Lou''s colleagues to try out an experimental treatment for curing autism. Crenshaw is a stereotypical corporate villain, and is never fleshed out, which is the biggest flaw in an otherwise excellent novel. But his attack on Lou brings up several issues: if you could cure a deep psychological problem like autism, would it be desirable to do so. If someone has come to an accommodation with his condition, wouldn''t the change be traumatic, and possibly be effectively eliminating that person''s former self? The novel explores these issues from Lou''s perspective.

The best thing about this novel is it''s use of the first person perspective to grant insight into how an autistic individual works. If you''re a Silicon Valley engineer, reading this novel will give you a very strong sense in how similar many engineers are to an autistic person, and where the big differences are. Jeff Bezoes is quoted as saying, "I learn more from fiction than from non-fiction books," and this book is illustrative: it''s more insightful than even autobiographical books like Born on a Blue Day. The treatment is extremely sympathetic, and extremely well written.

For some novelists, the central conflict''s resolution would end the novel, but not Moon. She goes on to explore all the deeper issues involved in the novel, and the conversation Lou has with himself is a lot of fun. This is an excellent novel, and I can highly recommend it.
2 people found this helpful
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Amazon verified Customer.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A tribute
Reviewed in the United States on June 18, 2020
Moving story of possibilities influenced by human biases and unaltruistic objectives. What science could do in the future that alters who a person is always supposedly for the better of society but who decides it is better, society as a whole, or just an elite few. Those... See more
Moving story of possibilities influenced by human biases and unaltruistic objectives. What science could do in the future that alters who a person is always supposedly for the better of society but who decides it is better, society as a whole, or just an elite few. Those to be affected are they really given a choice and even if they are do the understand how the change will affect them or are they just jumping off the cliff hoping when they hit the result wont be to bad.
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Top reviews from other countries

Tony James Slater
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Stunning!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 18, 2019
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, though it is quite wide of my usual genre. Such a strange experience, being inside the mind of an autistic person, but it felt very real and authentic. Lovely, gentle story and kind of sweet. Now back to the explosions and car chases ;)
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annie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the most thought provoking books I have ever read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 24, 2014
I am giving this a 5 star rating because it clearly brings out some of the issues that anyone with autism faces. I have just finished reading this novel. It is so different. It is not SCI-FI though, more like living and working through an autistic mind at some point in the...See more
I am giving this a 5 star rating because it clearly brings out some of the issues that anyone with autism faces. I have just finished reading this novel. It is so different. It is not SCI-FI though, more like living and working through an autistic mind at some point in the future. It would help anyone involved in health, looking after people, employers and anyone else who has even the tiniest interest in these facets of life to read this book and maybe they would realise how difficult life is for some ... Lovely, and a very thought provoking ending too....
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Kindle Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
not a book i would pay for
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 12, 2021
very dark slow and not entertaining in any way basicly humans are shitbags book about a bloke with autism and frankly boring
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Gordon Robinson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Autistic? What''s not to love?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 16, 2019
Just. Brilliant. Sweet, sensitive and strikes me that the author has experience. I''ve read quite a lot of Elizabeth Moon''s work but this one blew me away. Can''t recommend this too highly, it brought tears to my eyes.
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A. M. Stirling
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
worth reading
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 18, 2017
very good; unexpected. An insight into an autistic brain.
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